2013 Annual Shoemaker Lecture: David Brin

Lecture Information

Date:
October 1, 2013
Category:

 

RSVP IS CLOSED.

If you would like to attend tonight's event, all unoccupied seats will be opened to non-RSVP’ed guests on a first come first serve basis by 6:50pm. We cannot guarantee seating availability. 

EVENT DETAILS

Title: Humanity's Place in a Very Strange Universe

Time: 7:00pm

Where: MUR 101, ASU Tempe Campus | Click HERE for a map of ASU.

Parking: MUR 101 is in the center of campus so you have many choices. For a detailed list of parking locations and rates please click HERE

Seating: Seats are open to reservation holders on a first come, first-served basis and only to the person(s) present at registration. 

Doors Open: Approximately 6:30pm

Cost: Free & open to the public

RSVP List: Reservations do not guarantee seating. Seats are open to reservation holders on a first come, first-served basis and only to the person(s) present at registration. We recommend arriving by 6:30pm to ensure a seat. We will be opening up seats to non-RSVP’ed guests by 6:50pm.

Book Signing: We are pleased to announce that Dr. Brin has agreed to a book signing after the lecture! This opportunity is open to lecture guests on a first-come, first-served basis. Limit 3 books per person. 

Cancellations: If you are not able to attend, please notify us by emailing deepthought@asu.edu so we may accurately calculate attendance. Thank you in advance for your kind courtesy.

Questions: Please feel free to contact us via email at deepthought@asu.edu or by calling us at 480-965-3240

Abstract

Humanity's Place in a Very Strange Universe

Our compulsion to make "sense of it all" used to be satisfied by myths and faith. Today, we probe for evidence that leads in surprising directions. As we learn about the intelligence of higher animals, the uniqueness of human sapience stands out. Just when we seem mentally ready to meet alien life, the cosmos suddenly looks stark and empty. New technologies may enhance... or replace... our definitions of personhood.  And iconoclasts offer the disturbing theory that "the universe is all a simulation."  Four hundred years after Giordano Bruno was burned for asking questions like these, are we bound upon the greatest adventure of all?